Carleton University Art Gallery CUAG

CUAG Connects

DOUBLE MAJOR // January Edition: Spoken Word + Indigenous Justice

Tuesday, 27 January 2015, 7:00 p.m.

 
Join us for the first installment of the new year, where we’ll hear from two passionate experts, each speaking for 20 minutes about their subject, after which there will be a Q&A addressing both topics. One speaker is from the Ottawa-Gatineau community, and one is from the Carleton community. DOUBLE MAJOR is a fun and friendly way to stimulate discussion of seemingly disparate topics, and to make new connections between people and ideas. Lectures start at 7 pm.
 
Spoken Word (Jenna Tenn-Yuk) and Indigenous Justice (Jane Dickson-Gilmore)
 
DOUBLE MAJOR is brought to you by Carleton University Art Gallery and the Carleton University Alumni Association.
 
Speakers:
Jenna Tenn-Yuk is a spoken word artist, public speaker, facilitator, singer-songwriter and storyteller. She has performed and spoken nationally at TEDx, Pecha Kucha, Parliament Hill and numerous conferences. She created a monthly poetry series, Words to Live By, and facilitates spoken word workshops to help people find and speak their voices. Jenna has seen how the scars of her past have become beautiful ways to connect with people’s hearts and stories through poetry, music and journalism. She has a master’s degree in women’s studies at the University of Ottawa, where she lectured on spoken word and activism, and conducted research on the local slam poetry scene.
 
Dr. Jane Dickson-Gilmore is a professor in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University. Her work with the Mohawk Nation at Kahnawake toward the development of a separate, tradition-based legal system continues. Her current research includes First Nations and Citizenship and Membership, Criminology, Dispute Resolution and Restorative Justice, First Nations and Traditional Justice.
 
For the winter program, please visit: http://cuag.carleton.ca/index.php/exhibitions/doublemajor/
 
Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale. See the “visiting” page of CUAG’s website for details.

“Trick or Treaty” - Free screening and Q&A with Alanis Obomsawin and John Long (River Building 2200)

Friday, 30 January 2015, 7:00 p.m.

 
Trick or Treaty?  A film by Alanis Obomsawin

Free public screening followed by a Q &A with Alanis Obomsawin and John S. Long, author of Treaty No. 9
River Building Theatre 2200, Carleton University
Paid parking is available in the River Building parkade, or nearby in Lot 2

Trick or Treaty? is a feature documentary by the acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin. It profiles Indigenous leaders in their quest for justice as they seek to establish dialogue with the Canadian government. By tracing the history of their ancestors since the signing of Treaty No. 9, these leaders seek to raise awareness about issues vital to First Nations: respect for and protection of their lands and natural resources, and the right to hunt and fish. In recent years, an awareness-raising movement has been surfacing in First Nations communities. In this powerful documentary, those who refuse to surrender are given a chance to speak out.

Alanis Obomsawin is a member of the Abenaki First Nation and one of Canada’s most eminent documentary filmmakers. She has directed over forty films with the National Film Board of Canada, focusing on the lives and concerns of First Nations people. Obomsawin was named to the Canadian Film and Television Hall of Fame in 2010.

John S. Long is professor emeritus in the Schulich School of Education at Nipissing University. He is author of Treaty No. 9: Making the Agreement to Share the Land in Far Northern Ontario in 1905 (2010), and numerous other studies and scholarly articles on cultural encounter in the James Bay area. Treaty No. 9 was recognized by the Ontario History Society with the 2010 Fred Landon Book Prize, honouring the best book on regional history in Ontario.

This event is part of the Canadian Film Institute’s “The Enlightened Screen” series, and is co-presented by CUAG, the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language and Education, the History Department, School of Canadian Studies, School for Studies in Art and Culture, and the Mahatma Gandhi Peace Council of Ottawa.

CUAG in Conversation: W. McAllister Johnson and Stéphane Roy

Saturday, 7 February 2015, 2:00 p.m.

 
Please join us for a conversation between W. McAllister Johnson and Dr. Stéphane Roy in conjunction with the exhibition Making and Marketing Art History in 18th-century France. The exhibition examines the collaboration between painters and printmakers in the 18th-century, which dramatically expanded public knowledge of notable paintings. These universally accessible fine art prints shaped French culture and the discipline of art history.
 
W. McAllister Johnson is professor emeritus in the Department of Art of the University of Toronto. His extensive bibliography concerns artistic process, relations between painting and prints, and prints as an instrument of culture. Most recently he has authored for the University of Toronto Press Versified Prints in 18th-century France (2012) and The Rise and Fall of the Fine Art Print (forthcoming).
 
Dr. Stéphane Roy is an Assistant Professor of Art History at Carleton University. He is currently working on a book project entitled Another Tale of Two Cities: Prints and Printmaking in Eighteenth-Century London and Paris, which considers the art and trade of engravings in a transnational perspective. He has published extensively on 18th-century print culture (in French, English and German) and has given numerous papers in Europe and North America. Before joining Carleton, Roy spent three years at the Yale Center for British Art as a research associate in the Department of Prints and Drawings.

See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the new visitor parking in the P18 parkade.

CUAG Workshop: Hand Lettering for Valentine’s Day

Sunday, 8 February 2015, 10:00 a.m.

 
Inspired by the hand-written correspondence between lovers, friends, and family in Akram Zaatari: All Is Well, Ottawa-based designer Joanne Lauzon will be leading a hand lettering workshop for Valentine’s Day.  From 10am to 1pm, participants will be introduced to a variety of lettering styles, including modern calligraphy with pointed pen, in order to make romance-inspired cards or letters. All supplies will be provided.
 
Registration is required and there is a fee of $15. Please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to register or if you have any questions.
 
The gallery will provide coffee, tea, and treats.
 
See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the new visitor parking in the P18 parkade. 

DOUBLE MAJOR // February Edition: Mathematical Models + Postwar German Reconstruction

Tuesday, 10 February 2015, 7:00 p.m.

 
Join Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) for the sixth edition of the year, where we’ll hear from two passionate experts, each speaking for 20 minutes about their subject, after which there will be a Q&A addressing both topics. One speaker is from the Ottawa-Gatineau community, and one is from the Carleton community. Lectures start at 7pm. DOUBLE MAJOR is a fun and friendly way to stimulate discussion of seemingly disparate topics, and to make new connections between people and ideas.
 
Mathematical Models (David Pantalony) and Postwar German Reconstruction (Inderbir Riar)
 
DOUBLE MAJOR is brought to you by Carleton University Art Gallery and the Carleton University Alumni Association.
 
Speakers:
David Pantalony is the Curator of Physical Sciences and Medicine at the Canada Science and Technology Museum. He specializes in the history of scientific instruments, with an active research interest in Post-World War II science in Canada. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Department of History, University of Ottawa, where he teaches a collections-based seminar. He holds a PhD in the history of science from the University of Toronto (2002). In 2012 he won the Paul Bunge Book Prize for his book on Rudolph Koenig’s acoustical workshop in 19th century Paris. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.
 
Inderbir Riar joined the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism in 2011. He holds a PhD in architectural history from Columbia, where he completed a dissertation titled “Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity”. This work was initiated by a Collections Research Grant at the Canadian Centre for Architecture.  Riar has published in a range of books and journals, and he participates regularly at international conferences.  In collaboration with the award-winning Paris-based photographer Mark Lyon, Riar received a 2008 grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for the project “The Legacy of the Grands Ensembles: Documenting the Architecture of Toulouse-Le Mirail”. Riar’s research and teaching interests include the history and historiography of modern architecture and urbanism, technology and the avant-gardes, megastructures and Canadian modernity, utopia and utopianism, and ephemeral events such as world’s fairs.
 
For the winter program, please visit: http://cuag.carleton.ca/index.php/exhibitions/doublemajor/

Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale. See the “visiting” page of CUAG’s website for details.