Carleton University Art Gallery CUAG

CUAG Connects

Opening party for our winter exhibitions

Monday, 27 February 2017, 5:00 p.m.

Please join us for the opening party celebrating three new exhibitions:The Other NFB: The National Film Board of Canada’s Still Photography Division, 1941-1971, Outside These Walls: Photographs by Yannick Anton and David Ofori Zapparoli, and Making Radio Space in 1930s Canada. Artists and guest curators will be in attendance. Opening remarks will be at 6:00 p.m. and DJ Memetic will spin live vinyl sets. 

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space, with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.

Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale at the tunnel entrance commencing at 4:45 pm. See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the visitor parking in the P18 parkade.



Conversation with Yannick Anton, David Ofori Zapparoli, Pamela Edmonds and Kwende Kefentse

Tuesday, 28 February 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Please join us for a conversation between Toronto-based artists Yannick Anton and David Ofori Zapparoli with curator Pamela Edmonds, in conjunction with the exhibition Outside These Walls. Moderated by Kwende Kefenste, the conversation will reflect on the photographers’ shared approach to documenting urban life and its people.
 
Yannick Anton is a Toronto-based photographer. His candid and energetic photographs draw stylistic inspiration from the youthful, street, fashion, music and queer-positive cultures that he captures. He’s been documenting Yes Yes Y’all, a queer dancehall party in Toronto, since 2010, among other projects. http://www.yannickanton.com/
 
Informed by a strong social realist approach, David Ofori Zapparoli has represented the visual history of Canadian cities for over thirty years. Until 1999, he had focused on the public housing development of Regent Park, putting a human face on the stigmatized and transitional community of which he had been a part of since his teens. http://www.davidzapparoliphotography.com/
 
Pamela Edmonds is a visual and media arts curator currently based in Toronto. Her primary focus has been on thematic exhibitions that explore the politics of representation particularly as they relate to issues of race, gender and national identity. She also explores the impact of African diasporic cultures on the evolving geography of global contemporary art. Recent projects include Skin Deep: Reimaging the Portrait, Project Gallery, Toronto, 2015; Confluence: Shifting Perspectives of the Caribbean, Artist in Transit, 2014; Tracings: Recent Work by the W5Art Collective, Women’s Arts Resource Centre Gallery, Toronto and 28 Days: Reimagining Black History Month, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery/Georgia Scherman Projects, Toronto, 2012.
   
Born and raised in the Greater Toronto Area, Kwende Kefentse is currently living and working in Ottawa, Canada’s capital. Fascinated by cities, his various professional ventures reflect different explorations and investigations into how they function, with a particular focus on culture and space. Kwende helps to steward Ottawa’s Renewed Action Plan for Arts, Heritage and Culture (2013 - 2018) as a member of a small but mighty award-winning Cultural Development and Initiatives (CDI) team. Outside of his role at City Hall, Kwende is a DJ, producer and performer called Memetic. He is also one half of TIMEKODE, Ottawa’s longest running independent dance party.
 
Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space, with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.
 
Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale at the tunnel entrance commencing at 6:45 pm. See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the visitor parking in the P18 parkade.



15-year anniversary of Project Naming: Lunch, tour and conversations at CUAG

Thursday, 2 March 2017, 12:00 p.m.

Thursday, 2 March, 2017
12:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Carleton University Art Gallery
This event is free and includes lunch, but please register (see link below).

Library and Archives Canada in collaboration with Carleton University invite you to commemorate 15 years of Project Naming. Please join us to attend any of the free sessions on Wednesday March 1 to Friday March 3, 2017, as we gather to reflect on the past 15 years of Project Naming and its engagement with Aboriginal communities, and look to the future of this important initiative.

On Thursday, 2 March, CUAG will host an afternoon session, beginning with lunch and a tour of The Other NFB: The National Film Board of Canada’s Still Photography Division, 1941-1971 by co-curators Carol Payne and Sandra Dyck. There will also be a conversation with Elder Piita Irniq, Elder Manitok Thompson, and Elder Sally Webster, moderated by Deborah Kigjugalik Webster.

Project Naming provides a virtual space enabling First Nations, Métis Nation and Inuit communities to access Canada’s historic photo collections and engage in the identification of people and locations, thereby reconnecting with their history to share memories and stories rekindled by the photographs.

For more information on all the events, and to register for the sessions, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/15-years-of-project-naming-15-ieme-anniversaire-un-visage-un-nom-tickets-31997773201



Curators’ talk: Making Radio Space in 1930s Canada

Tuesday, 14 March 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Please invite us for an exhibition walk-through and talk by Making Radio Space in 1930s curators Michael Windover and Anne MacLennan. Presenting a look at the visual and material culture of radio in 1930s Canada, this exhibition offers a new way to think about a medium closely associated with twentieth-century modernity.
 
Anne MacLennan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at York University and the York graduate program director of the York-Ryerson Joint Graduate Program in Communication & Culture. Her work is concerned with radio, media history, popular culture, social welfare, women and communication studies.
 
Michael Windover, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the School for Studies in Art & Culture at Carleton University in Ottawa where he teaches in the History and Theory of Architecture Program. His research interests focus on modern visual and material culture, especially designed environments in the twentieth century.
 
Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space, with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.
 
Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale at the tunnel entrance commencing at 6:45 pm. See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the visitor parking in the P18 parkade.



Panel discussion: Exploring the photographs, films and music of the NFB

Tuesday, 28 March 2017, 6:58 p.m.

Please join us for a conversation on the National Film Board featuring Janine Marchessault, Carol Payne and Stephen Low, moderated by André Loiselle. This event merges the CUAG exhibition The Other NFB with the critical conversations taking place in two Carleton University seminars being offered this semester on the NFB, taught by Carol Payne (ARTH 5500) and James Wright (MUSI 5004/FILM 5209). Join the students for this unique public convergence of their course, with special guests Janine Marchessault and Stephen Low. 
   
Janine Marchessault holds a Canada Research Chair in Art, Digital Media and Globalization at York University. Over the past five years she has also worked with researchers and curators to uncover some of missing film experiments pioneered at Expo 67. Her latest co-edited anthology (with M. K. Gagnon) Reimagining Cinema: Film at Expo 67 (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014) documents these multiscreen events. Marchessault has recently received the prestigious Trudeau Fellowship Award to support her research.
 
Carol Payne is an Associate Professor of Art History, research associate with the Centre for Public History, member of the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language and Education, and member of the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre, all at Carleton University. In addition to The Official Picture: The National Film Board of Canada’s Still Photography Division and the Image of Canada, 1941-1971, she is co-editor with Andrea Kunard of The Cultural Work of Photography in Canada (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2011).
 
Stephen Low is a Montreal-based filmmaker who has delivered more experiences in the IMAX® 3D medium than any other director, including Titanica and Volcanoes of the Deep Sea. His filmography includes more than fifteen giant screen films and over three decades of work shaping extraordinary experiences for audiences around the world. He is also the son of legendary NFB filmmaker and producer Colin Low, who pioneered the introduction of IMAX 3D with the National Film Board of Canada and IMAX Corporation in 1986.
 
André Loiselle is Professor of Film Studies and Assistant Vice-President (Academic) at Carleton University. His main areas of research are Canadian and Québécois cinema, the horror film, and theatricality on screen. Recent publications include The Canadian Horror Film: Terror of the Soul (2015, with Gina Freitag), Stages of Reality: Theatricality in Cinema (2012, with Jeremy Maron), Denys Arcand’s Le Déclin de l’empire américain and Les Invasions barbares (2008), Cinema as History: Michel Brault and Modern Quebec (2007) and Canada Exposed (2009, with Pierre Anctil and Christopher Rolfe).
 
Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space, with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.
   
Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale at the tunnel entrance commencing at 6:45 pm. See the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions and details of the visitor parking in the P18 parkade.